Foosballs and Fermions

I am in most senses a geek. My greatest loves are Physics, Mathematics, Molecular Biology, and the structure and functioning of nature in general.

libutron:

The shades of blue of the Willdenow’s Spikemoss
Selaginella willdenowii (Selaginellales - Selaginellaceae) is a species of spikemoss. Although sometimes these plants are commonly called Peacock ferns, they are not true ferns but fern-like plants or fern-allies.
It is a scrambling terrestrial plant with blue-green fronds that exhibit amazing iridescence when young, appearing to change color from different shades of blue, green and purple, depending on the light and angle, and turn pink, red and purple when exposed over time to bright sunlight. The blue leaves gradually turn to green with age or exposure to more direct light.
Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of a layered lamellar structure of the upper cuticle of iridescent leaves as being responsible for the blue iridescence. A recent research on this topic do not support the idea that iridescence in plants acts to enhance light capture of photosynthetically important wavelengths, because the reflectance of light in the range 600–700 nm is very similar for both iridescent and non-iridescent leaves. 
However, it has been hypothesized some other adaptive advantages that leaf iridescence may offer, such as a visual defense against herbivores, a mechanism to protect shade-adapted plants against sun-flecks and other potentially damaging sudden high light levels, and a polarization filter enhancing orientation of photosynthetic apparatus within the cell. 
Native to Myanmar, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, this species  has now been naturalized in many countries after been introduced as a garden ornamental.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Driss & Marrionn | Locality: Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

libutron:

The shades of blue of the Willdenow’s Spikemoss

Selaginella willdenowii (Selaginellales - Selaginellaceae) is a species of spikemoss. Although sometimes these plants are commonly called Peacock ferns, they are not true ferns but fern-like plants or fern-allies.

It is a scrambling terrestrial plant with blue-green fronds that exhibit amazing iridescence when young, appearing to change color from different shades of blue, green and purple, depending on the light and angle, and turn pink, red and purple when exposed over time to bright sunlight. The blue leaves gradually turn to green with age or exposure to more direct light.

Transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of a layered lamellar structure of the upper cuticle of iridescent leaves as being responsible for the blue iridescence. A recent research on this topic do not support the idea that iridescence in plants acts to enhance light capture of photosynthetically important wavelengths, because the reflectance of light in the range 600–700 nm is very similar for both iridescent and non-iridescent leaves. 

However, it has been hypothesized some other adaptive advantages that leaf iridescence may offer, such as a visual defense against herbivores, a mechanism to protect shade-adapted plants against sun-flecks and other potentially damaging sudden high light levels, and a polarization filter enhancing orientation of photosynthetic apparatus within the cell. 

Native to Myanmar, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, this species  has now been naturalized in many countries after been introduced as a garden ornamental.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Driss & Marrionn | Locality: Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

(via plant-a-day)

robpyne:

'Spud' has one-day show of splendour!

CBG has flowered 5 titan arums and this is the second time that “Spud” has flowered. It last…

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robpyne:

'Spud' has one-day show of splendour!

CBG has flowered 5 titan arums and this is the second time that “Spud” has flowered. It last…

View Post

(via indefenseofplants)

brilliantbotany:

health-gasm:

fit-free-fun:

thehealthywarrior:

weightwatcherqueen:

Terrific Tip: Flip the bell peppers over to check their gender. The ones with four bumps are female and those with three bumps are male. The female peppers are full of seeds, but sweeter and better for eating raw and the males are better for cooking. Isn’t that cool? 


That is awesome!

if this is true this is so freaking cool

Definitely not true. Bell peppers are the fruits of Capsicum annum, and in botanical terms they are berries: a mature fruit formed from a single ovary. There is no such thing as a male or female pepper; they are all matured ovaries that contain seeds.

brilliantbotany:

health-gasm:

fit-free-fun:

thehealthywarrior:

weightwatcherqueen:

Terrific Tip: Flip the bell peppers over to check their gender. The ones with four bumps are female and those with three bumps are male. The female peppers are full of seeds, but sweeter and better for eating raw and the males are better for cooking. Isn’t that cool? 

That is awesome!

if this is true this is so freaking cool

Definitely not true. Bell peppers are the fruits of Capsicum annum, and in botanical terms they are berries: a mature fruit formed from a single ovary. There is no such thing as a male or female pepper; they are all matured ovaries that contain seeds.

currentsinbiology:

LD50
The dose is much lower when administered orally. We’re still trying to get the paper into the needles for subcutaneous injection.
Brilliant xkcd.com!

currentsinbiology:

LD50

The dose is much lower when administered orally. We’re still trying to get the paper into the needles for subcutaneous injection.

Brilliant xkcd.com!

scienthusiasts:

Codariocalyx motorius, known as the telegraph plant or semaphore plant, is a tropical Asian shrub, one of a few plants capable of rapid movement. This plant is famous for its movement of small, lateral leaflets at speeds rapid enough to be perceivable with the naked eye. This is a strategy to maximise light by tracking the sun. Each leaf is equipped with a hinge that permits it to be moved to receive more sunlight, but the weight of these leaves means the plant must expend a lot of energy in moving it. To optimise its movement, each large leaf has two small leaflets at its base. These move constantly along an elliptical path, sampling the intensity of sunlight, and directing the large leaf to the area of most intensity. (Wikipedia)
GIF created from this video

It can dance to music, guys! MUSE

scienthusiasts:

Codariocalyx motorius, known as the telegraph plant or semaphore plant, is a tropical Asian shrub, one of a few plants capable of rapid movementThis plant is famous for its movement of small, lateral leaflets at speeds rapid enough to be perceivable with the naked eye. This is a strategy to maximise light by tracking the sun. Each leaf is equipped with a hinge that permits it to be moved to receive more sunlight, but the weight of these leaves means the plant must expend a lot of energy in moving it. To optimise its movement, each large leaf has two small leaflets at its base. These move constantly along an elliptical path, sampling the intensity of sunlight, and directing the large leaf to the area of most intensity. (Wikipedia)

GIF created from this video

It can dance to music, guys! MUSE

(via rocketsandorscience)

currentsinbiology:

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems
In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.
While trees’ pollution removal equated to an average air quality improvement of less than 1 percent, the impacts of that improvement are substantial. Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution. “Tree and Forest Effects on Air Quality and Human Health in the United States,” is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/46102
"With more than 80 percent of Americans living in urban area, this research underscores how truly essential urban forests are to people across the nation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory. "Information and tools developed by Forest Service research are contributing to communities valuing and managing the 138 million acres of trees and forests that grace the nation’s cities, towns and communities."
English oak leaf pores or stomata (Quercus robur)

currentsinbiology:

First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems

In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, U.S. Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.

While trees’ pollution removal equated to an average air quality improvement of less than 1 percent, the impacts of that improvement are substantial. Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year in a study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution. “Tree and Forest Effects on Air Quality and Human Health in the United States,” is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/46102

"With more than 80 percent of Americans living in urban area, this research underscores how truly essential urban forests are to people across the nation," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the Forest Products Laboratory. "Information and tools developed by Forest Service research are contributing to communities valuing and managing the 138 million acres of trees and forests that grace the nation’s cities, towns and communities."

English oak leaf pores or stomata (Quercus robur)

(via science-poetry-of-reality)

libutron:

Mosses and Liverworts
Tiny Mosses (Hypnodendron menziesii) and Liverworts (Jungermannia hodgsonae) on a tree trunk.
Photo credit: ©Peter Nijenhuis | Locality: West Coast, South Island, New Zealand

libutron:

Mosses and Liverworts

Tiny Mosses (Hypnodendron menziesii) and Liverworts (Jungermannia hodgsonae) on a tree trunk.

Photo credit: ©Peter Nijenhuis | Locality: West Coast, South Island, New Zealand

(via arrowtongue)

griseus:

There is a wide range of lifespans for the various creatures that inhabit the oceans.
infographic produced by Smarter Every Day

griseus:

There is a wide range of lifespans for the various creatures that inhabit the oceans.

(via libutron)

explore-blog:

A visual compendium of bioluminescent creatures by Seattle-based artist Eleanor Lutz, reminiscent of Ernest Haeckel’s pioneering drawings from the early 1900s. Also available as a poster.
Pair with the first poem published in a scientific journal, an ode to bioluminescence. 
(via Visually)

explore-blog:

A visual compendium of bioluminescent creatures by Seattle-based artist Eleanor Lutz, reminiscent of Ernest Haeckel’s pioneering drawings from the early 1900s. Also available as a poster.

Pair with the first poem published in a scientific journal, an ode to bioluminescence

(via Visually)

(via vetstudent-microbiologymaniac)