Foosballs and Fermions

I am in most senses a geek. My greatest loves are Physics, Mathematics, Molecular Biology, and the structure and functioning of nature in general.

libutron:

Insectivorous plant | ©Kalyan Varma   (high slopes of Eravikulam National Park, India)
Drosera peltata (Caryophyllales - Droseracea) is an insectivorous plant fairly common in Australia, Tasmania northwards to SE Asia and India.

libutron:

Insectivorous plant | ©Kalyan Varma   (high slopes of Eravikulam National Park, India)

Drosera peltata (Caryophyllales - Droseracea) is an insectivorous plant fairly common in Australia, Tasmania northwards to SE Asia and India.

(via indefenseofplants)

nanuen:

Researchers have, for the first time, successfully grown cells ex vivo that replicates vaginal tissue and its resident microbes. One of the benefits of this feat is that it will allow scientists to investigate how prescription or over-the-counter pharmaceuticals like contraceptives, antibiotics and antifungals interact with both “good” and “bad” microbes and vaginal skin cells. A study recently published in PLoS ONE used this model of microbial/human vaginal tissue to discover that certain bacterial communities alter the way HIV infects and replicates. Additionally, they have discovered that a bacterial community associated with bacterial vaginosis substantially reduced the antiviral activity of one of the leading anti-HIV medicines.Read more: http://bit.ly/PcHJ13Publication: Cultivated Vaginal Microbiomes Alter HIV-1 Infection and Antiretroviral Efficacy in Colonized Epithelial Multilayer Cultures. PLoS ONE, 2014 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093419Image: TEM of immature budding HIV-1 virus particles budding from cell membrane of CEM cell culture. Scale bar is 100 nanometres. 200,000xImage credit: R. Dourmashkin, Wellcome Images

nanuen:

Researchers have, for the first time, successfully grown cells ex vivo that replicates vaginal tissue and its resident microbes. One of the benefits of this feat is that it will allow scientists to investigate how prescription or over-the-counter pharmaceuticals like contraceptives, antibiotics and antifungals interact with both “good” and “bad” microbes and vaginal skin cells. 
A study recently published in PLoS ONE used this model of microbial/human vaginal tissue to discover that certain bacterial communities alter the way HIV infects and replicates. Additionally, they have discovered that a bacterial community associated with bacterial vaginosis substantially reduced the antiviral activity of one of the leading anti-HIV medicines.

Read more: http://bit.ly/PcHJ13
Publication: Cultivated Vaginal Microbiomes Alter HIV-1 Infection and Antiretroviral Efficacy in Colonized Epithelial Multilayer Cultures. PLoS ONE, 2014 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093419

Image: TEM of immature budding HIV-1 virus particles budding from cell membrane of CEM cell culture. Scale bar is 100 nanometres. 200,000x
Image credit: R. Dourmashkin, Wellcome Images

(via shychemist)

bbsrc:

Food, famine and fungi

Ustilago maydis is a fungus that infects maize crops and causes the disease corn smut. In these images you can see the corn smut fungus (green) infecting a maize leaf (red). This infection will cause large plant ‘tumors’ and can eventually result in plant death.

Diseases like this pose a major threat to modern agriculture and therefore understanding fungal plant pathogens is of huge importance. 

BBSRC-funded scientists from The University of Exeter hope to understand the complex interplay between this fungal pathogen and its plant host. This knowledge will then help in the development of novel fungicides that can stop crop infection and keep food on our forks.

Images and research from Professor Gero Steinberg at the University of Exeter.

For more information on his research go to: http://bit.ly/1sbhNCo

For more plant related blog posts go to: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq16IST19r

Or visit our Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/bbsrcnews

(via neuro-genesis)

ecobota:

Toxicodendron radicans
Poison Ivy leaves unfurling for the year
April 15, 2014

Growing up a chain link fence at Bartram’s Garden, Philadelphia Pennsylvania

thenewenlightenmentage:

Neurons Tune into Different Frequencies for Different Spatial Memory Tasks
Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin.
*Please see the notes for important information regarding this research.*
The research, published in the journalNeuron on April 17, may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s, in which gamma waves are disturbed.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Neurons Tune into Different Frequencies for Different Spatial Memory Tasks

Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin.

*Please see the notes for important information regarding this research.*

The research, published in the journalNeuron on April 17, may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s, in which gamma waves are disturbed.

Continue Reading

mineralists:

Petrified Wood

mineralists:

Petrified Wood

(Source: flickr.com, via libutron)

scienceyoucanlove:

The phenomenon shown in this shot is called guttation, the exudation of tiny drops of xylem sap that accumulate on the tips or edges of leaves some vascular plants, such as grasses. It is different to dew, which condenses from the atmosphere onto the plant surface.via ScienceAlert 
 

scienceyoucanlove:

The phenomenon shown in this shot is called guttation, the exudation of tiny drops of xylem sap that accumulate on the tips or edges of leaves some vascular plants, such as grasses. It is different to dew, which condenses from the atmosphere onto the plant surface.

via ScienceAlert
 

 

(via callipygianology)

thatscienceguy:

Amazing electron microscope imagery! (some of these have been artificially colored)

More Sciency Galleries - http://thatscienceguy.bestgalleries.me/

(via neuro-genesis)

theconservationbiologist:

Plant of the week - Hart’s-tongue fern (Asplenium scolopendrium)

A common European fern species, but no less fascinating. It is unusual in having simple undivided fronds. Their tongue-like shape gave rise to their name, as well as the inclusion of the word ‘Hart’, meaning a male adult deer. The etymology of its name goes even further, as the fern’s sori (the structures underneath the leave which produce spores), share a similar pattern with centipedes legs, hence the specific name is ‘scolopendrium’ which is Latin for centipede. 

Leaves are on average 10-60cm in length and relatively narrow at 3-6cm.
The species is often found in neutral and basic soils, and can often be seen growing out of cracks in rock and old walls. There is actually one growing out of my chimney of my house!
Photo on wall: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/Spiers_harts_tongue_fern.JPG
Leaf detail: http://www.crocus.co.uk/images/products2/PL/00/00/00/18/PL0000001808_card_lg.jpg

theconservationbiologist:

Plant of the week - Hart’s-tongue fern (Asplenium scolopendrium)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/Spiers_harts_tongue_fern.JPG

A common European fern species, but no less fascinating. It is unusual in having simple undivided fronds. Their tongue-like shape gave rise to their name, as well as the inclusion of the word ‘Hart’, meaning a male adult deer. The etymology of its name goes even further, as the fern’s sori (the structures underneath the leave which produce spores), share a similar pattern with centipedes legs, hence the specific name is ‘scolopendrium’ which is Latin for centipede.

http://www.crocus.co.uk/images/products2/PL/00/00/00/18/PL0000001808_card_lg.jpg

Leaves are on average 10-60cm in length and relatively narrow at 3-6cm.

The species is often found in neutral and basic soils, and can often be seen growing out of cracks in rock and old walls. There is actually one growing out of my chimney of my house!

Photo on wall: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/Spiers_harts_tongue_fern.JPG

Leaf detail: http://www.crocus.co.uk/images/products2/PL/00/00/00/18/PL0000001808_card_lg.jpg

(via theherbarium)