Foosballs and Fermions

I am in most senses a geek. My greatest loves are Physics, Mathematics, Molecular Biology, and the structure and functioning of nature in general.

libutron:

Fossil fish and palm frond
As if seeing an old photo (actually very old), this extraordinary fossil exhibits part of the freshwater paleoenvironment of the Eocene (56 to 34 million years ago) in the Fossil Butte (Fossil Lake), Green River Formation, Wyoming, US.
The fish in this specimen are Knightia eocaena (Clupeidae), an extinct bony fish related to herring and sardines, considered the state fossil of Wyoming. The palm frond is Sabalites powellii (Arecales - Palmae), an extinct large-leaved fan palm.
Photo credit: ©Doug Sherman

libutron:

Fossil fish and palm frond

As if seeing an old photo (actually very old), this extraordinary fossil exhibits part of the freshwater paleoenvironment of the Eocene (56 to 34 million years ago) in the Fossil Butte (Fossil Lake), Green River Formation, Wyoming, US.

The fish in this specimen are Knightia eocaena (Clupeidae), an extinct bony fish related to herring and sardines, considered the state fossil of Wyoming. The palm frond is Sabalites powellii (Arecales - Palmae), an extinct large-leaved fan palm.

Photo credit: ©Doug Sherman

getouterspace:

Giant birds, Camelidae and Giraffidae

(via arrowtongue)

bpod-mrc:

16 October 2014
Hijacking Fat Cells
Most drugs developed to treat obesity reduce appetite by influencing signaling systems in the gastrointestinal tract or central nervous system. They don’t work very well, though, and produce unwanted side effects. It would be better to directly target fat cells, or adipocytes, which store excess fat. But attempts to use viruses to insert therapeutic genes into fat cells have failed. Now, researchers have used a peptide to deliver a DNA sequence that de-activates a protein in fat cells involved in fat storage. The idea is to hijack the cell and control how much fat it stores. When the researchers injected this peptide-gene package into obese mice, they observed improvements in metabolic function and a 20 percent reduction in body weight after seven weeks. One concern is that the complex might affect other cell types, but the study suggests a new way to use gene therapy to treat obesity in humans.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Yong-Hee Kim and colleagues Hangyang University, South Korea Copyright held by original authorsResearch published in Nature Materials, August 2013
—
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bpod-mrc:

16 October 2014

Hijacking Fat Cells

Most drugs developed to treat obesity reduce appetite by influencing signaling systems in the gastrointestinal tract or central nervous system. They don’t work very well, though, and produce unwanted side effects. It would be better to directly target fat cells, or adipocytes, which store excess fat. But attempts to use viruses to insert therapeutic genes into fat cells have failed. Now, researchers have used a peptide to deliver a DNA sequence that de-activates a protein in fat cells involved in fat storage. The idea is to hijack the cell and control how much fat it stores. When the researchers injected this peptide-gene package into obese mice, they observed improvements in metabolic function and a 20 percent reduction in body weight after seven weeks. One concern is that the complex might affect other cell types, but the study suggests a new way to use gene therapy to treat obesity in humans.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Yong-Hee Kim and colleagues
Hangyang University, South Korea
Copyright held by original authors
Research published in Nature Materials, August 2013

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Last week we saw what happens when a solid projectile hits a water droplet; today’s video shows the impact of a laser pulse on a droplet. Several things happen here, but at very different speeds. When the laser impacts, it vaporizes part of the droplet within nanoseconds. A shock wave spreads from the point of impact and a cloud of mist sprays out. This also generates pressure on the impact face of the droplet, but it takes milliseconds—millions of nanoseconds—for the droplet to start moving and deforming. The subsequent explosion of the drop depends both on the laser energy and focus, which determine the size of the impulse imparted to the droplet. The motivation for the work is extreme ultraviolet lithography—a technique used for manufacturing next-generation semiconductor integrated circuits—which uses lasers to vaporize microscopic droplets during the manufacturing process. (Video credit: A. Klein et al.)

fuelant:

Sonoran Desert (Upland) Snowstorm (2/2). February 20th, 2013, near Tucson, Arizona.  

(Source: ericrosenwaldphotography, via hyggehaven)

anthrocentric:

moon-medicine:

my-wayward-shawn:

dogjpeg:

randallascot:

roachpatrol:

creatures-alive:

Tando (via 500px / sleeping Tando by Hendy Mp)

what the fuck? wh a t the fuck??? what. what the fuck. 


holy shit


in english it’s called a Sunda Flying Lemur

Flying sloth. Lookit

sloth bat ♡

They’re super cute and all so here’s a fun fact: the Sunda Flying Lemur, otherwise known as the Sunda Coluga are not true lemurs. There are two known species of colugos (flying lemurs) and they (along with tree shrews) are genetically close to primates.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/11/071101-lemur-relative.html
http://eol.org/pages/1040858/details

anthrocentric:

moon-medicine:

my-wayward-shawn:

dogjpeg:

randallascot:

roachpatrol:

creatures-alive:

Tando (via 500px / sleeping Tando by Hendy Mp)

what the fuck? wh a t the fuck??? what. what the fuck. 

image

holy shit

image

in english it’s called a Sunda Flying Lemur

Flying sloth. Lookit

sloth bat ♡

They’re super cute and all so here’s a fun fact: the Sunda Flying Lemur, otherwise known as the Sunda Coluga are not true lemurs. There are two known species of colugos (flying lemurs) and they (along with tree shrews) are genetically close to primates.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/11/071101-lemur-relative.html

http://eol.org/pages/1040858/details

(via rotiferola)

rjzimmerman:

From the World Wildlife Fund report entitled, “Living Planet Report,” on loss of species. (By the way, the graphs use the acronym, “LPI,” which is translated as the “Living Plant Index,” which measures more than 10,000 representative populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Those populations have declined by 52 per cent since 1970. 

The World Wildlife Fund says: “Put another way, in less than two human generations, population sizes of vertebrate species have dropped by half. These are the living forms that constitute the fabric of the ecosystems which sustain life on Earth – and the barometer of what we are doing to our own planet, our only home. We ignore their decline at our peril.”

The report can be read here.

(via science-junkie)

woodsia76:

Fruiting bodies

woodsia76:

Fruiting bodies

(via mycology)


On September 9, 2014, 22 people nestled into 16 hammocks for one epic chillout session. Photographer Sebastian Wahlhütter was on hand to capture the day’s events which took place on Monte Piana, in the famous Dolomites mountain range of northeastern Italy.
via Twisted Sifter
bbsrc:

For the first time flowering plants have been successfully engineered to fix carbon like the blue-green algae do – this can potentially increase photosynthesis and yields in crop plants.
Plants, algae and some bacteria capture light energy from the sun and transform it into chemical energy by the process named photosynthesis. Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) have a more efficient mechanism in carrying out photosynthesis than plants. For a long time now, it has been suggested that if plants could carry out photosynthesis with a similar mechanism to that of the blue-green algae, plant productivity and hence crop yields could improve.
Rothamsted Research scientists strategically funded by the BBSRC and in collaboration with colleagues at Cornell University funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation have used genetic engineering of tobacco plants - a tobacco plant can been seen above - to demonstrate for the first time that flowering plants can carry out photosynthesis utilizing a faster bacterial Rubisco enzyme rather than their own slower Rubisco enzyme. These findings represent a milestone toward the goal of improving the photosynthetic rate in crop plants.
Copyright: Rothamsted Research
Read more on this story: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2014/140917-pr-big-step-towards-efficient-photosynthesis.aspx

bbsrc:

For the first time flowering plants have been successfully engineered to fix carbon like the blue-green algae do – this can potentially increase photosynthesis and yields in crop plants.

Plants, algae and some bacteria capture light energy from the sun and transform it into chemical energy by the process named photosynthesis. Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) have a more efficient mechanism in carrying out photosynthesis than plants. For a long time now, it has been suggested that if plants could carry out photosynthesis with a similar mechanism to that of the blue-green algae, plant productivity and hence crop yields could improve.

Rothamsted Research scientists strategically funded by the BBSRC and in collaboration with colleagues at Cornell University funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation have used genetic engineering of tobacco plants - a tobacco plant can been seen above - to demonstrate for the first time that flowering plants can carry out photosynthesis utilizing a faster bacterial Rubisco enzyme rather than their own slower Rubisco enzyme. These findings represent a milestone toward the goal of improving the photosynthetic rate in crop plants.

Copyright: Rothamsted Research

Read more on this story: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2014/140917-pr-big-step-towards-efficient-photosynthesis.aspx

(via scienthusiasts)