Foosballs and Fermions

I am in most senses a geek. My greatest loves are Physics, Mathematics, Molecular Biology, and the structure and functioning of nature in general.

Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes

museumably:

(via hyggehaven)

rocktopussy:

becausebirds:

Kiwi on a treadmill.

well you can tell by the way i use my walk i’m a flightless bird
i can only walk

rocktopussy:

becausebirds:

Kiwi on a treadmill.

well you can tell by the way i use my walk i’m a flightless bird

i can only walk

(via vetstudent-microbiologymaniac)

woseph:

a very weird one here

woseph:

a very weird one here

(via hyggehaven)

mindblowingscience:

World wildlife populations halved in 40 years - report

The global loss of species is even worse than previously thought, the London Zoological Society (ZSL) says in its new Living Planet Index.
The report suggests populations have halved in 40 years, as new methodology gives more alarming results than in a report two years ago.
The report says populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by an average of 52%.
Populations of freshwater species have suffered an even worse fall of 76%.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

World wildlife populations halved in 40 years - report

The global loss of species is even worse than previously thought, the London Zoological Society (ZSL) says in its new Living Planet Index.

The report suggests populations have halved in 40 years, as new methodology gives more alarming results than in a report two years ago.

The report says populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by an average of 52%.

Populations of freshwater species have suffered an even worse fall of 76%.

Continue Reading.

(via knowledgeandlove)

bpod-mrc:

29 September 2014
Carbon Nanotube Couriers
Our genetic code is held in each of our cells in the form of tightly packed DNA. It’s the template of all the essential information for an organism’s life and must be faithfully copied each and every time a cell divides. Mistakes in the duplication of the double helix of DNA can have catastrophic consequences such as genetic abnormalities and cancer. A protein called MCM2-7 is responsible for separating the two DNA strands during the process of replication. Using electron microscopy and bioinformatics technology on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast proteins researchers have now revealed the 3D arrangement of MCM2-7 (computer model pictured). Modelling the structure of this hexameric [made up of six subunits] protein provides insights into how it interacts with the double helix of DNA and allows its separation and duplication as cells divide.
Written by Sylvia Tognetti
—
Image by Alberto RieraDNA Replication Group, Imperial College London Copyright held by original authors
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

29 September 2014

Carbon Nanotube Couriers

Our genetic code is held in each of our cells in the form of tightly packed DNA. It’s the template of all the essential information for an organism’s life and must be faithfully copied each and every time a cell divides. Mistakes in the duplication of the double helix of DNA can have catastrophic consequences such as genetic abnormalities and cancer. A protein called MCM2-7 is responsible for separating the two DNA strands during the process of replication. Using electron microscopy and bioinformatics technology on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast proteins researchers have now revealed the 3D arrangement of MCM2-7 (computer model pictured). Modelling the structure of this hexameric [made up of six subunits] protein provides insights into how it interacts with the double helix of DNA and allows its separation and duplication as cells divide.

Written by Sylvia Tognetti

Image by Alberto Riera
DNA Replication Group, Imperial College London
Copyright held by original authors

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

rhamphotheca:

Root Systems of Prairie Plants
Prairies are often called “the upside-down forest” since the majority of the biomass (the plant parts) of the system is underground (up to 70%). Compass plant and blazing star, stars of the prairie screen, noted in this line drawing of roots, reach 15 feet deep. The different morphology of the root systems works in harmony, with each plant taking advantage of a soil niche, mingling and “shaking hands” with all of the other plants in the soil, as they do above the soil.
(via: Native Prairies Association of Texas‎)
click image to see larger

rhamphotheca:

Root Systems of Prairie Plants

Prairies are often called “the upside-down forest” since the majority of the biomass (the plant parts) of the system is underground (up to 70%). Compass plant and blazing star, stars of the prairie screen, noted in this line drawing of roots, reach 15 feet deep. The different morphology of the root systems works in harmony, with each plant taking advantage of a soil niche, mingling and “shaking hands” with all of the other plants in the soil, as they do above the soil.

(via: Native Prairies Association of Texas)

click image to see larger

(via callipygianology)

kqedscience:

Meet the Fish That Can’t Get Jet-Lagged
“Birds have ‘em. Bees have ‘em. Even bacteria havecircadian rhythms, the ramping up and slowing down of internal functions that signals organisms to be more or less active, depending on the time of day. Humans have circadian rhythms too—and when they’re disrupted by time-zone changes, lack of sleep or working the night shift, the result can be an increased risk of heart attacks, depression, diabetes, weight gain and more.
For eyeless Mexican cave fish, however, no problem, says anew study in the journal PLOS ONE reports. “Some organisms have stronger circadian rhythms, and some weaker,” says lead author Damian Moran, of the private company Plant and Food Research, based in New Zealand. “But these fish have none at all.”
Read more from timemagazine.

kqedscience:

Meet the Fish That Can’t Get Jet-Lagged

Birds have ‘em. Bees have ‘em. Even bacteria havecircadian rhythms, the ramping up and slowing down of internal functions that signals organisms to be more or less active, depending on the time of day. Humans have circadian rhythms too—and when they’re disrupted by time-zone changes, lack of sleep or working the night shift, the result can be an increased risk of heart attacksdepressiondiabetesweight gain and more.

For eyeless Mexican cave fish, however, no problem, says anew study in the journal PLOS ONE reports. “Some organisms have stronger circadian rhythms, and some weaker,” says lead author Damian Moran, of the private company Plant and Food Research, based in New Zealand. “But these fish have none at all.”

Read more from timemagazine.

(via ichthyologist)

milinutilidades:

Astrocytes in confocal microscopy!!
They are so beautiful!!!! =D 
Astrocytes are cells derivative from blood monocytes. This cell play an important hole in your brain function, and is one of the so many HIV reservoir in the body, that block the total cure of the disease… 
Imagem from Glaucia Hajj - A.C. Camargo Cancer Center (http://www.artbiobrasil.org/#!astrocitos/c1umn)

milinutilidades:

Astrocytes in confocal microscopy!!

They are so beautiful!!!! =D 

Astrocytes are cells derivative from blood monocytes. This cell play an important hole in your brain function, and is one of the so many HIV reservoir in the body, that block the total cure of the disease… 

Imagem from Glaucia Hajj - A.C. Camargo Cancer Center (http://www.artbiobrasil.org/#!astrocitos/c1umn)

(via scientificthought)

indefenseofplants:

blooms-and-shrooms:

Cypripedium fargesii by Rainbirder on Flickr.

O_o

nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 

despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 

the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures.

for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.

notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”

this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.

(via galaxyclusters)